Memorials and Martyrs in Modern Lebanon

الغلاف الأمامي
Indiana University Press, 21‏/10‏/2010 - 272 من الصفحات
0 مراجعات

Lebanese history is often associated with sectarianism and hostility between religious communities, but by examining public memorials and historical accounts Lucia Volk finds evidence for a sustained politics of Muslim and Christian co-existence. Lebanese Muslim and Christian civilians were jointly commemorated as martyrs for the nation after various episodes of violence in Lebanese history. Sites of memory sponsored by Maronite, Sunni, Shiite, and Druze elites have shared the goal of creating cross-community solidarity by honoring the joint sacrifice of civilians of different religious communities. This compelling and lucid study enhances our understanding of culture and politics in the Middle East and the politics of memory in situations of ongoing conflict.

 

ما يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة

لم نعثر على أي مراجعات في الأماكن المعتادة.

المحتويات

Introduction
1
Sectarianism Memorials and Martyrdom
17
Competing Ceremonies and Mutilated Faces 19151957
39
Fearless Faces and Wounded Bodies 19581995
78
Dismembered Bodies and National Unity 19962003
115
Assassinations Massacres and Divided MemoryScapes 20042006
154
Possibilities and Limits
189
Appendix Important Dates
203
Notes
205
Bibliography
231
Index
243
حقوق النشر

طبعات أخرى - عرض جميع المقتطفات

عبارات ومصطلحات مألوفة

حول المؤلف (2010)

Lucia Volk is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Co-director of Middle East and Islamic Studies at San Francisco State University.

معلومات المراجع